UCI BMX WORLD CHAMPIONSHIPS IN HOUSTON CANCELLED

COVER PIC: Courtesy of Craig Dutton

UCI confirmed in a press release last night that there will be no World Championships in the discipline of BMX for 2020, with the next world championships taking place in Papendal (Netherlands) on 17-22 August 2021, post the Olympic games in Tokyo.

Please CLICK HERE for the full statement from the UCI.

BMXA is continuing to work with stakeholders of the 2020 BMXA National Championships to be held in Launceston, with a view to providing a definite decision on the event in the coming weeks.

We greatly appreciate everyone’s patience, support and understanding as we work through these challenges.

UCI BMX World Championships in Houston postponed


Given the announcement, BMXA are continuing to work with the UCI and stakeholders to finalise and advise dates for the rescheduled 2020 BMXA National Championships and Oceania Championships to be held in Launceston in late 2020. As soon as we are in a position to confirm and publicly announce the new dates we will do so.

We greatly appreciate everyone’s patience, support and understanding as we work through these challenges.

The UCI statement is below….

In the current context of the coronavirus (Covid-19) pandemic, which also affects the United States, the Union Cycliste Internationale (UCI) regrets to announce the necessity to postpone the 2020 UCI BMX World Championships which were initially to take place at the Rockstar Energy Bike Park in the United States from 26 to 31 May.

The UCI fully supports the decision taken by the organisers of the Harris

County – Houston Sports Authority, the authorities of the city of Houston, in the state of Texas, and of Harris County. In view of the current health situation, holding the UCI BMX World Championships, preceded by the amateur Challenge class, would have potentially posed a risk to the health of the riders, all those involved in the event and the fans.

Regarding the qualification process for the Tokyo 2020 Olympic Games, the UCI BMX World Championships in Houston were initially to be the last event on the UCI International BMX Calendar offering qualification points, since the qualifying period was due to end on 1st June. In the context of the coronavirus and in the interests of safety and sporting fairness, the UCI recalls – as announced on March 15 – that it asked the International Olympic Committee (IOC) to stop the qualification period retroactively as of 3 March, given that until this date, no nation had been prevented from going to events because of the pandemic.

This position may of course be reviewed depending on the decisions taken by the IOC regarding the Tokyo 2020 Olympic Games.

Concerning the postponement of the 2020 UCI BMX World Championships, the UCI will work with the organisers to fix a new date. In accordance with the decisions announced on March 20 concerning disciplines other than road, in connection with the coronavirus, the UCI stresses that the UCI World Championships have priority within the framework of the revision of the UCI International Calendar with a view to the resumption of the 2020 season.

The UCI shares the disappointment of the BMX community after the decision to postpone the 2020 UCI BMX World Championships and wishes to thank the Organising Committee of the Harris County – Houston Sports Authority for its cooperation in this difficult situation, as well as the athletes, teams, partners and all parties involved in the event for their understanding.

UCI release championship class quotas for World Championships

COVER PIC: Courtesy of Craig Dutton

Australia has received five positions for both elite men and elite women, along with an entry for Kai and Saya Sakakibara who both earned a position by virtue of their world ranking at the conclusion of 2019.

In the junior elite classes, Australia are entitled to enter five men and two women.

For the full list of qualification quotas released by the UCI, CLICK HERE.

The Australian representatives for championship classes will be selected under the Cycling Australia Selection Policy and Appeals Process for UCI World Championships. You can find that policy here. 

Race Plates in 2020

COVER PIC: Courtesy of GET SNAPT 

As of this year, BMXA are not issuing race plates for the national series. This means riders can use their own race plates and save time acquiring one on the day.

Race plate colours will vary depending on the class the rider competes in. An example of this is, only riders with a UCI issued International Elite Number will be permitted to use white plates and black number combinations. A black plate with white numbers will not be permitted at any of the national series events.

Race plate numbers will vary from event to event with state numbers only permitted at state or club events, for all national events, only Australian and world number combinations will be permitted (i.e. W1 and 1A with the correct colour combination).  The number a rider enters for their first stage of the 2019 BMXA National Series, will be their number for the entire series, unless they have achieved a national or world plate result at the respective events.  A change to an “A” or “W” plate will be permitted if requested after these events.

All of the above is clearly outlined in Rule 54 of the BMXA 2020 Rule Book on pages 35 & 36.

If riders turn up with an incorrect colour/number combination they will be requested to change it prior to taking to the track and/or starting the next lap. Further to this if riders require a plate on race day for the national series events, BMXA will have limited number of race plate available for sale at a cost of $50.

If you would like to review the BMXA 2020 Rule Book – CLICK HERE

Please CLICK HERE, for a full breakdown of race plate numbers and colours.

A year off for the NSW Young Star

It has been a tough year in terms of success for the rising star from NSW.

In 2018 Miller found the top of the junior elite podium on a multitude of platforms including the national championships in Bunbury, as well as a dominant performance on the national series stage.

2018 National Championships: Junior elite women’s final

Winning again after Oceania’s on Wednesday 🙌,

Watch Ashlee Miller win the women’s junior elite at Bunbury BMX Club Inc. #BMXANats18

Posted by BMX Australia on Saturday, March 24, 2018

Yet 2019 couldn’t be more different, starting with a heavy crash on the first berm during the stage 1 of the 2019 BMXA BAD BOY National Series in Sydney.

That injury put a halt on her national series campaign, missing out on stage 2 at Westside before returning spectacularly to stage 3 at Ipswich, where she went bar-for-bar with Beenleigh’s Des’Ree Barnes and Pine Rivers’ Kiana Botfield to win on overall points.

Unfortunately, that was the final national stage victory for the 18-year old, who was on track for another successful year on the bike.

Her final major race was the national championships in May at Shepparton, and it ended in disaster for the HSC student who came down hard in the second moto, breaking her collarbone in the process.

(Watch from 13:20)

“My collarbone broke so far about that it would never heal without help,” Miller explained.

“I was in so much pain after nationals. What was worse was that I had an eight-hour drive from Shepparton to Sydney with a broken shoulder and as soon as I got home, I was taken straight to hospital for surgery.

“This means that I’m out for the all the world cup rounds in Australia, which I am really gutted about. My plan was to go to all four of the world cup rounds before enjoying my end of high school and taking a gap year travelling.

“But now I’m going to flip it around and travel first before hopefully having a couple of races in the national rounds in America at the back end of the year.”

It was well known how excited Miller was for the 2019 season after discussing with BMXA how much she was looking forward to tackling the 8-metre hill at nationals (Shepparton). But health needed to come first and Miller needed to focus on her higher school certificate before continuing her career on the BMX bike.

“It was a real shame to come down at nationals,” Miller continued.

“I think my lead up to the event couldn’t have gone any smoother and I felt great during the first moto. But coming together with Desi in that first straight was pretty heart-wrenching, but I guess that’s the sport. It’s not called a full body contact sport for nothing.

“But my health needed to come first, especially with some concussions at the start of the year in Sydney so I needed to focus on my schoolwork in the back end.”

Nevertheless, Miller will return to the bike and she is reassuring naysayers she can’t wait to do so.

“I spoke to Luke (Madill) who offered me a spot on the national team, but I had to sadly decline.

“I’m not saying I’m never going to be back; I love racing and everything about it. But I was always going to take a gap year next year and haven’t really decided on anything yet. I guess we shall see.”

Petre is recharged and ready to go!

COVER PIC: Courtesy of MadB Photography

On September 16, 2018, Shannon Petre crashed in the second moto of the women’s superclass, during the sixth round of the 2018 BMXA BAD BOY National Series.

Petre flew home to Cairns suffering from a broken collarbone. Her arm was completely paralysed and for three months, she couldn’t move her hand let alone her fingers.

Feeling finally returned to Petre and as soon as she had gotten out of the sling, her family had packed up and moved to Brisbane where the 16-year old has signed up with Pine Rivers.

“It was nine months before I could ride and my first race back was the Hinterlands Open in July where I finished second behind Sara (Jones),” Petre said.

Two months later and Petre was lining up on the gate in her biggest race of the year, the 2019 BMX Queensland Bendigo Bank State Championships at Sarina BMX Club.

It was a booming bounce back for the rising star who claimed the top spot in the superclass category ahead of a star-studded Queensland gate.

Even though Petre was relegated in her first moto, she blitzed the rest of her qualifiers to find herself in the final against the 2018 elite national champion Erin Lockwood, 2019 junior elite national champion Des’Ree Barnes, former world no.1 Kira Hill, and the 2019 UCI junior elite and superclass national series champion, Kiana Botfield.

A couple months on and Petre is continuing to aim for the sky as the looming 2020 BMX season kicks off in dramatic style.

“I’ve just started a new block of training and don’t have any more races planned for 2019,” Petre said.

“But next year is huge with the Nerang International in January and then the four world cups, which I’m really excited about doing as my first year as a junior elite.

“I’m so excited to compete in those rounds. Just to have a go and have no pressure and make it all about the experience. Racing against the girls I’ve idolised and getting to go on the gate with them is going to be so awesome.”

Having missed out on half this year due to injury, Petre is ready to seize 2020 and there are some big goals in mind to make up for lost time.

“I’ve been looking forward to this moment for so long. Everything I’ve been working for is finally here and I can’t wait,” Petre said.

“My goals for the world cup are to hopefully make it to the qualifying rounds, but as I said it’s all about experience.

“My favourite type of racing is supercross, riding off big hills and hitting those jumps. My main goal for 2020 is to get selected for worlds, which means I’m even missing my school formal to go to the nationals in Tassie!

“I’m feeling really good, I haven’t been back to the physio for a while and I’m just trying to build up my strength in both arms now before the world championships in Houston,” Petre said.

Preparations are already in motion with Petre taking part in BMXA’s training camps at the Bathurst track a couple weeks ago, surrounded by her team of superstars.

“Bathurst was really great working, with my coach Shaun Dwight and the boys. It’s really good getting to train with guys like Connor (Fields), Izaac (Kennedy), Max (Cairns) and Andy (Hughes),” Petre said.

“I’m really looking forward to 2020.”

Joel Marsh set for superclass in 2020

Happy Valley’s Joel Marsh is ready for another year on the bike and in particular, his long-awaited debut in the superclass category.

The rising South Australian has had a mixed run of results in 2019, coming down at the nationals in Shepparton as well as the worlds in Belgium.

But the youngster has remained committed to his training and emerged through the clouds to finish on top of the 15-boy’s national series standings, after he dominated the final three rounds in Adelaide, Hobart and Canberra.

“It felt really awesome to grab the national series title,” Marsh said.

“I haven’t really had the best year crashing at nationals and worlds, but it was really relieving to win it and I was really stoked. It’s definitely my best result this year after all the hard work.”

Marsh’s debut in the superclass category had been delayed a year due to the new BMXA that had increased the age limit to 16.

This has been discussed at length throughout the BMX community and BMXA’s Luke Madill voices the reasons and benefits to this ruling – READ HERE – something that Marsh understands and appreciates.

“The rule change to the superclass age limit was good and bad… but it’s given me a great chance to prepare myself for the big jump I’ll be taking next year. I can’t wait!”

“It definitely gave me heaps of confidence having one more year in my age. There’s quite a big gap in the ages and abilities in superclass especially when a lot of them do it as their career. It’s a big step up in racing.”

But his superclass debut is finally upon the shredder and he’s eager to show his skills against the best in the business, even against his training buddy.

“I’ve been waiting quite a while for a chance to race the superclass. I’m really looking forward to lining up on the gate against so many riders that I have looked up to,” he said.

“I’m especially looking forward to racing against Shane (Rosa). We train together quite a lot and there’s always a good bit of banter between us. He always jokes with me and I like that I’m catching up to him every time we train.”

With less than two months remaining before he takes the plunge in 2020, Marsh is doing everything he can to ensure he is ready for the gates to drop and has many goals already on his list to ensure he does one better than 2019.

“My training has been going really well at the moment. I’ve got (Olympian) Brian (Kirkham) helping me and I’m pretty positive I can do well,” Marsh said.

“I think my main goal next year is to get on the podium at worlds in Houston. If I keep working hard and training goes well, I reckon I can achieve it.”

Marsh is preparing for the 2019 Victorian Open State Championships at Casey BMX Club this weekend (November 22-24) and is relishing at the opportunity to add to his successes in his final bout of the year.

SPRING SALE!!!


2019 BMX National Championships Merchandise

T-Shirts $23.00

Long Sleeve T-Shirts $25.00

Caps (flat brim or baseball cap) $15.00

Kids Hoodies $40.00 – Adult Hoodies $45.00

World Champs Merch

Rider T-Shirt $25.00

Polo $28.00

The 2019 Inductees to the Australian BMX Hall of Fame

Five members of the BMXA family have been inducted into Australian BMX Museum’s Hall of Fame as the second instalment of the gala dinner brought BMX admirers from around the country to celebrate the deep history of BMX in Australia last Saturday, August 10.

Alongside the HOF inductions, the 2019 Sam Willoughby Medal was awarded to Rockingham’s Jordan Callum, who has had an incredible year of racing. Read that HERE!

Below are the five new additions to the Hall of Fame.


Tai-Lee Muxlow #006

Tai-Lee Muxlow began racing in 1981 at her home track of Cardiff in NSW. Starting out as a little pocket rocket, Muxlow instantly acquired a taste for winning and is recognised for one of the most iconic winning streaks of all time as well one of the most successful Australian BMX racers of all time

Throughout her career in the sport, Muxlow claimed no less than 13 state titles, nine national titles and in 1990, she finally added a world no.1 plate to her impressive tally.

Muxlow was a sponsor’s dream with her champion qualities on and off the track.  SE Racing supported her early career before she was picked up by GT Bicycles as part of the highly successful team that dominated the 1980’s and 90’s.

Throughout her career, she would promote the sport through regular newspaper, magazine and television appearances.

After BMX, Muxlow would go on to to dominate the mountain bike scene winning more national titles and in 2002 was crowned the Australian Female Mountain Bike Cyclist of the Year.

Muxlow is arguably amongst the most successful cross disciplined cyclists Australia has ever produced.

Hall Of Fame Inductee #006 – Tai-Lee Muxlow

Who would have known that Tai-Lee Muxlow, a little pocket rocket, would become one of the most successful Australian BMX racers of all time.

Throughout her career in the sport, Tai Lee won 13 state titles, 9 national titles and in 1990, she finally added a world no.1 to her impressive tally.

Congratulations Tai-Lee Muxlow – BMX Hall of Fame Inductee #006

Australian BMX Museum | UCI | UCI BMX Supercross

Posted by BMX Australia on Sunday, August 11, 2019


Sam Willoughby #007

After coming home from school with a flyer to try out BMX at his local track in Adelaide,  Sam Willoughby quickly took to the sport and rose through the ranks to stamp his mark on what was to be the start of one of the greatest BMX careers Australia has ever seen.

By age 10, Willoughby had won his first national championships. He then went on to win back-to-back junior elite world titles as well as his first USA AA Pro victory.

From that point on, Sam was the man to beat – taking out the UCI BMX World Cup series, the elite men’s world championship title, the ABA national no.1 Pro and multiple national elite men’s titles on top of that.

Most notably were his achievements in 2012, as the South Australian competed in his first Olympic Games and claimed a silver medal – Australia’s only ever Olympic medal in BMX.

Sam would continue his dominance at the elite level, winning another UCI World Cup series, the Golden Crankset Pro of the year, Nora Cup Pro of the Year, USA BMX national #1 Pro and racking up some of the largest winning streaks ever on the USA pro circuit.

At the 2016 Rio Olympics, Willoughby dominated the heats and looked a favourite for the gold – but it wasn’t to be, missing out on a medal but did Australia immensely proud with his achievements.

Just weeks after the Rio games, Sam suffered a career ending injury.

As the BMX world held their breath waiting for news, Willoughby took on his toughest challenge yet, going through intensive therapy on a long road to recovery.

His determination and willpower are nothing short of incredible, drawing on his champion qualities to achieve his goals such as walking his wife, Alise, down the aisle at their wedding.

Willoughby has now embarked on a new chapter of his BMX career as a coach, passing on his valuable knowledge and no doubt, his competitive nature.

More recently Willoughby has taken to the public speaking circuit as a highly sought after guest speaker.

Hall Of Fame Inductee #007 – Sam Willoughby

It could have been a perfectly scripted come and try BMX advertisement – the day a young Sam Willoughby came home from school with a flyer to try out BMX at his local track in his home state of South Australia. Sam quickly took to the sport and rose through the ranks to stamp his mark on what was to be the start of one of the greatest BMX careers, Australia has ever seen.

By age 10, Sam had won his first national championships, as a Junior Elite Sam would win back to back world titles, as well as his first USA AA Pro wins. From that point on Sam was the man to beat – taking out the UCI World Cup Series, Elite Men World Champion, ABA National Number one Pro and more National Elite Mens titles.

In 2012 competing in his first Olympic Games, Sam rode to claim the Silver Medal – Australia’s only ever Olympic Medal in BMX. Sam would continue his dominance at the Elite Level, winning another UCI World Cup Series, Golden Crankset Pro of the year, Nora Cup Pro of the Year, USA BMX national #1 Pro and racking up some of the largest winning streaks ever on the USA PRO circuit.

At the 2016 RIO Olympics, Sam dominated the heats and looked unbeatable for Gold – but it wasn’t to be, missing out on a medal – but doing Australia immensely proud with his achievements.

Just weeks after the RIO games Sam would suffer a career ending injury. As the BMX world held their breath waiting for news – Sam took on his toughest challenge yet, going through intensive therapy on a long road to recovery. His determination and willpower were nothing short of incredible, with Sam drawing on his champion qualities to achieve his goals, including walking his amazing wife Alise down the aisle at their wedding. Sam has now embarked on a new chapter of his BMX career – as a coach, passing on his valuable knowledge and no doubt, his competitive nature. More recently Sam has taken to the public speaking circuit as a highly sought after guest speaker. One thing is for certain – Sam will be the best at whatever he does, and wherever it takes him.

Ladies and gentleman please give the biggest welcome to Australian BMX Hall Of Fame Inductee – Sam Willoughby.

Posted by Australian BMX Hall Of Fame on Wednesday, August 7, 2019


Andrew Figliomeni #008

 

Western Australia has produced some of the most successful BMX racers in Australia and even though BMX may have caught on a little later than in the eastern states, this didn’t stop many Western Australian’s invading the podium at national titles in the early 80’s.

Among them was a young Andrew Figliomeni, who began racing in 1979 at his home track at Westside BMX Club. Along with his older brothers, the Figliomeni name quickly struck fear in the mind of every Australian rider they came up against.

By the age of 7, Figliomeni was dominating his age group, unbeaten in his home state, winning eight state titles in a row and at a national level, he would dictate his age and cruiser classes with seven national titles.

But it wasn’t just at home that the name Figliomeni was feared. The world stage was were Figliomeni stamped his true mark on BMX.

He was one of Australia’s first world champions, winning dual world titles in Holland in 1983, again in 1984, a cruiser world title in Canada in 1985, and winning his age class again in England in 1986, bringing his world title tally to five.

Figliomeni would be sponsored over much of his career by Kuwahara Bicycles, and appeared on numerous television news stories, promoting the sport of BMX around the country. His world title wins would inspire a generation that followed, and he was without doubt the most successful male rider of the 1980’s.

Hall Of Fame Inductee #008 – Andrew Figliomeni

Andrew Figliomeni started racing in 1979 at his home track of Westside BMX Club. He was an immensely respected competitor – all around the world – he was literally unbeatable on a BMX bike

In his early years, he had won no less than 8 state titles in the 20inch and 7 national cruiser titles.

But it wasn’t just at home that the name Figliomeni was feared. He was one of Australia’s first world champions, winning dual world titles in Holland in 1983, again in 1984, a cruiser world title in Canada in 1985 and again winning his age class in England in 1986 – bringing his world no.1 title tally to 5.

Posted by BMX Australia on Monday, August 12, 2019


Tracey Kosikowski – #009

Tracey Kosikowski began racing in 1979 and competed in the earliest state and national titles, including the first unofficial national titles – called the Big Plate Series.

Kosikowski pioneered junior female racing and quickly caught the attention of sponsors, riding for SE racing and GT Bicycles.

Although she almost always ran her career number of 84 on the plate – it was no.1’s that she began piling up in the trophy room at home.

Racing in America has always been the dream for many Aussie riders and in 1982 when they began venturing to the USA for race experience, Kosikowski went too… not for experience, but to dominate the locals winning the Murray NBL World Cup and the War of the Stars.

In 1983, she continued her International success when she was amongst the first Australian world champions, winning the 12-13 girl’s IBMXF world plate in Holland.

Back at home, Kosikowski was unbeatable, dominating her home state of QLD and racking up national wins in 1983, 84, and 86 before retiring from the sport at the top of her game.

In 2000, she was honoured with an Australian Sporting Achievement Medal and is also a life member of the Redlands BMX Club, a club with rich history and success, thanks largely to the calibre of riders such as Tracey.

Hall Of Fame Inductee #009 – Tracey Kosikowski

Tracey Kosikowski began racing in 1979 and pioneered junior female racing. She won multiple competitions and was among the first Australian world champions, winning the 12-13 girl’s IBMXF world plate in Holland.

The Redlands Bmx Club rider was unbeatable in her home state and racked up national wins in 1983, 84, and 86 before retiring from the sport at the top of her game.

Congratulations Tracey – 2019 Inductee to the Hall of Fame!

Australian BMX Museum | #BMXAFamily

Posted by BMX Australia on Tuesday, August 13, 2019


Steve Cassap – #010

It was 1978 when Steve Cassap first laid eyes on a BMX bike. As a keen motocross rider, he and his mates soon fell in love with BMX bikes, making jumps in back yards and parking lots and just simply hanging out and having fun.

Cassap took up racing when BMX tracks first appeared in Victoria, but it wasn’t on the track that got him attention – instead, it was what he was doing off the track that did.

Freestyle BMX riding had not officially been invented yet. Originally known as “trick-riding”, Steve had a natural ability to launch his bike and do amazing aerial tricks. These tricks soon caught the eyes of the publications who were looking for anything new they could get their hands on and although Steve didn’t realise it at the time, he was pioneering freestyle riding in Australia.

At the same time as his trick riding career was taking off, Cassap was already quite the entrepreneur.

He studied the American magazines for products and quickly realised that there was a huge market in race plates. At just 17 years of age, and with a small amount of cash, Cassap began producing custom made number plates, all made by hand on his bedroom floor.

He cleverly handed them out to many of the top pro riders who were seen sporting his unique designs, and sales quickly took off.

To assist in promoting his products, Cassap began doing freestyle shows in carparks and shopping centres as well as at major BMX race meetings and scored feature spots on ABC prime time television shows.

He sponsored his own BMX race team and in 1983, he joined Bob Haro as the first internationally sponsored Haro freestyle rider. In 1984, they toured Australia performing shows together and further promoting Cassap and the CASSAP brand.

This brand quickly became an Aussie BMX icon, with CASSAP plates being used by world champions and countless pro riders.

Cassap’s designs were unique and innovative. His fold-over strap design would go on to be copied by some of the largest international brands and was hugely popular throughout the 1980’s.

Cassap was inducted into the Victorian BMX Hall Of Fame in 1993 and it was with great pleasure that the Australian BMX Museum induct their very first freestyle rider and first industry icon into the Australian BMX Hall Of Fame.

Hall Of Fame Inductee #010 – Steve Cassap

It was 1978 when a young Steve Cassap first laid eyes on a BMX bike. A keen motorcross rider, he and his mates soon fell in love with BMX bikes, making jumps in back yards and parking lots, simply hanging out and having fun. Steve took up racing when the first BMX tracks appeared in Victoria, but it wasn’t on the track that got him attention – instead, it was what he was doing off the track that did.

Freestyle BMX riding had not officially been invented yet. Originally known as “trick-riding”, Steve had a natural ability to launch his bike and do amazing aerial tricks. These tricks soon caught the eyes of the publications who were now multiplying and looking for anything new they could get their hands on. Although Steve didn’t realise it at the time – he was pioneering Freestyle riding in Australia.

At the same time as his trick riding career was taking off – Steve was already quite the entrepreneur. He studied the American magazines for products and quickly realised that there was a huge market in number plates. At just 17 years of age, and a small amount of cash, Steve began producing custom made number plates – all made by hand – on his bedroom floor. He cleverly handed them out to many of the top pro riders who were quickly seen sporting his unique designs – and sales quickly took off.

To assist in promoting his products, Steve began doing freestyle shows in carparks and shopping centres, at major BMX race meetings and scored feature spots on ABC prime time television shows. He sponsored his own BMX race team, and In 1983 he joined BOB Haro – as the first internationally sponsored Haro Freestyle rider. In 1984 they would tour Australia performing shows together, further promoting Steve and the CASSAP brand.

This brand quickly became an Aussie BMX icon – with CASSAP plates being used by World Champions and countless Pro riders. Steve’s designs were unique and innovative. His fold-over strap design would go on to be copied by some of the largest international brands and was hugely popular throughout the 1980’s.

Steve was inducted into the Victorian BMX Hall Of Fame in 1993 and it is with great pleasure that we induct our very first Freestyle rider and first Industry icon into the Australian BMX Hall Of Fame.

Ladies and gentleman please welcome – Steve Cassap.

Posted by Australian BMX Hall Of Fame on Wednesday, August 7, 2019


For more information on the Australia BMX Museum’s Hall of Fame – CLICK HERE