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Junior elite BMX rider Erin Lockwood is a local member of the Nerang BMX Club in Queensland. She’s been racing for most of her life, starting off at the tender age of four and quickly…

Junior elite BMX rider Erin Lockwood is a local member of the Nerang BMX Club in Queensland. She’s been racing for most of her life, starting off at the tender age of four and quickly following in the footsteps of her elder brother, who she often watched compete.

Now at 18 years of age, Lockwood is ready to jet-set to her second world championships later this month. She impressively raced to third place at this year’s national championships in Brisbane, which was enough to secure her place on the gate in Rock Hill.

While being on her bike and dicing bar-to-bar with some of Australia’s top emerging female riders is where Lockwood is best known from, off the bike she is also building a legion of young fans.

Each week Lockwood dedicates time to nurturing a new generation of female BMX rider at Nerang. Her mother Debbie affectionately refers to the girl’s only coaching session as ‘Erin’s Girls Coaching Session’, on the club’s social media pages.

The idea of an all-female focused session got off the ground a couple of years ago when Lockwood sustained an injury that kept for off the track. Determined to stay involved with the sport during her recovery period, she decided to start coaching. Her initial foray into coaching started off as an assistant to her own coach, Darren Lamb.

It quickly became apparent to Lockwood that she loved coaching so much that she decided to undertake her Level 1 coaching course and begin running her own sessions.

“I definitely plan to continue coaching, I would like to set myself up for when I retire from racing. I want to still be able to contribute to the sport and continue to help girls riding BMX,” said Lockwood.

“At the moment I hold the session once a week. I am hoping to build that eventually to multiple sessions and even include off-track workouts like sprints.”

The idea of holding a girl’s session was sparked for Lockwood when she saw Lamb running something similar with girls her age. She decided she wanted to do the same, with a focus on young beginners.

In a sport where the gender balance is dominated by male riders, Lockwood found her calling in giving young female riders the opportunity to feel comfortable in the sport, especially those just in the beginner’s stage.

“So often girl’s miss out on opportunities because they are intimidated by the boys who are stronger and faster. I want to give them a boost and encourage them to participate in the sport,” she said adamantly.

“Growing up in the sport I was always racing up classes because there weren’t that many girls racing. Today there are so many more girls competing in the sport and there are so many more opportunities for girls in BMX.”

Such is the passion, positivity and supportive nature of Lockwood to encouraging young girl’s into the sport, that the upwards growth of female participation should be considered nothing less than a fait accompli.

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