News

A plethora of history was celebrated during an unforgettable night on the Gold Coast.

Five members of the BMXA family have been inducted into Australian BMX Museum’s Hall of Fame as the second instalment of the gala dinner brought BMX admirers from around the country to celebrate the deep history of BMX in Australia last Saturday, August 10.

Alongside the HOF inductions, the 2019 Sam Willoughby Medal was awarded to Rockingham’s Jordan Callum, who has had an incredible year of racing. Read that HERE!

Below are the five new additions to the Hall of Fame.


Tai-Lee Muxlow #006

Tai-Lee Muxlow began racing in 1981 at her home track of Cardiff in NSW. Starting out as a little pocket rocket, Muxlow instantly acquired a taste for winning and is recognised for one of the most iconic winning streaks of all time as well one of the most successful Australian BMX racers of all time

Throughout her career in the sport, Muxlow claimed no less than 13 state titles, nine national titles and in 1990, she finally added a world no.1 plate to her impressive tally.

Muxlow was a sponsor’s dream with her champion qualities on and off the track.  SE Racing supported her early career before she was picked up by GT Bicycles as part of the highly successful team that dominated the 1980’s and 90’s.

Throughout her career, she would promote the sport through regular newspaper, magazine and television appearances.

After BMX, Muxlow would go on to to dominate the mountain bike scene winning more national titles and in 2002 was crowned the Australian Female Mountain Bike Cyclist of the Year.

Muxlow is arguably amongst the most successful cross disciplined cyclists Australia has ever produced.

Hall Of Fame Inductee #006 – Tai-Lee Muxlow

Who would have known that Tai-Lee Muxlow, a little pocket rocket, would become one of the most successful Australian BMX racers of all time.

Throughout her career in the sport, Tai Lee won 13 state titles, 9 national titles and in 1990, she finally added a world no.1 to her impressive tally.

Congratulations Tai-Lee Muxlow – BMX Hall of Fame Inductee #006

Australian BMX Museum | UCI | UCI BMX Supercross

Posted by BMX Australia on Sunday, August 11, 2019


Sam Willoughby #007

After coming home from school with a flyer to try out BMX at his local track in Adelaide,  Sam Willoughby quickly took to the sport and rose through the ranks to stamp his mark on what was to be the start of one of the greatest BMX careers Australia has ever seen.

By age 10, Willoughby had won his first national championships. He then went on to win back-to-back junior elite world titles as well as his first USA AA Pro victory.

From that point on, Sam was the man to beat – taking out the UCI BMX World Cup series, the elite men’s world championship title, the ABA national no.1 Pro and multiple national elite men’s titles on top of that.

Most notably were his achievements in 2012, as the South Australian competed in his first Olympic Games and claimed a silver medal – Australia’s only ever Olympic medal in BMX.

Sam would continue his dominance at the elite level, winning another UCI World Cup series, the Golden Crankset Pro of the year, Nora Cup Pro of the Year, USA BMX national #1 Pro and racking up some of the largest winning streaks ever on the USA pro circuit.

At the 2016 Rio Olympics, Willoughby dominated the heats and looked a favourite for the gold – but it wasn’t to be, missing out on a medal but did Australia immensely proud with his achievements.

Just weeks after the Rio games, Sam suffered a career ending injury.

As the BMX world held their breath waiting for news, Willoughby took on his toughest challenge yet, going through intensive therapy on a long road to recovery.

His determination and willpower are nothing short of incredible, drawing on his champion qualities to achieve his goals such as walking his wife, Alise, down the aisle at their wedding.

Willoughby has now embarked on a new chapter of his BMX career as a coach, passing on his valuable knowledge and no doubt, his competitive nature.

More recently Willoughby has taken to the public speaking circuit as a highly sought after guest speaker.

Hall Of Fame Inductee #007 – Sam Willoughby

It could have been a perfectly scripted come and try BMX advertisement – the day a young Sam Willoughby came home from school with a flyer to try out BMX at his local track in his home state of South Australia. Sam quickly took to the sport and rose through the ranks to stamp his mark on what was to be the start of one of the greatest BMX careers, Australia has ever seen.

By age 10, Sam had won his first national championships, as a Junior Elite Sam would win back to back world titles, as well as his first USA AA Pro wins. From that point on Sam was the man to beat – taking out the UCI World Cup Series, Elite Men World Champion, ABA National Number one Pro and more National Elite Mens titles.

In 2012 competing in his first Olympic Games, Sam rode to claim the Silver Medal – Australia’s only ever Olympic Medal in BMX. Sam would continue his dominance at the Elite Level, winning another UCI World Cup Series, Golden Crankset Pro of the year, Nora Cup Pro of the Year, USA BMX national #1 Pro and racking up some of the largest winning streaks ever on the USA PRO circuit.

At the 2016 RIO Olympics, Sam dominated the heats and looked unbeatable for Gold – but it wasn’t to be, missing out on a medal – but doing Australia immensely proud with his achievements.

Just weeks after the RIO games Sam would suffer a career ending injury. As the BMX world held their breath waiting for news – Sam took on his toughest challenge yet, going through intensive therapy on a long road to recovery. His determination and willpower were nothing short of incredible, with Sam drawing on his champion qualities to achieve his goals, including walking his amazing wife Alise down the aisle at their wedding. Sam has now embarked on a new chapter of his BMX career – as a coach, passing on his valuable knowledge and no doubt, his competitive nature. More recently Sam has taken to the public speaking circuit as a highly sought after guest speaker. One thing is for certain – Sam will be the best at whatever he does, and wherever it takes him.

Ladies and gentleman please give the biggest welcome to Australian BMX Hall Of Fame Inductee – Sam Willoughby.

Posted by Australian BMX Hall Of Fame on Wednesday, August 7, 2019


Andrew Figliomeni #008

 

Western Australia has produced some of the most successful BMX racers in Australia and even though BMX may have caught on a little later than in the eastern states, this didn’t stop many Western Australian’s invading the podium at national titles in the early 80’s.

Among them was a young Andrew Figliomeni, who began racing in 1979 at his home track at Westside BMX Club. Along with his older brothers, the Figliomeni name quickly struck fear in the mind of every Australian rider they came up against.

By the age of 7, Figliomeni was dominating his age group, unbeaten in his home state, winning eight state titles in a row and at a national level, he would dictate his age and cruiser classes with seven national titles.

But it wasn’t just at home that the name Figliomeni was feared. The world stage was were Figliomeni stamped his true mark on BMX.

He was one of Australia’s first world champions, winning dual world titles in Holland in 1983, again in 1984, a cruiser world title in Canada in 1985, and winning his age class again in England in 1986, bringing his world title tally to five.

Figliomeni would be sponsored over much of his career by Kuwahara Bicycles, and appeared on numerous television news stories, promoting the sport of BMX around the country. His world title wins would inspire a generation that followed, and he was without doubt the most successful male rider of the 1980’s.

Hall Of Fame Inductee #008 – Andrew Figliomeni

Andrew Figliomeni started racing in 1979 at his home track of Westside BMX Club. He was an immensely respected competitor – all around the world – he was literally unbeatable on a BMX bike

In his early years, he had won no less than 8 state titles in the 20inch and 7 national cruiser titles.

But it wasn’t just at home that the name Figliomeni was feared. He was one of Australia’s first world champions, winning dual world titles in Holland in 1983, again in 1984, a cruiser world title in Canada in 1985 and again winning his age class in England in 1986 – bringing his world no.1 title tally to 5.

Posted by BMX Australia on Monday, August 12, 2019


Tracey Kosikowski – #009

Tracey Kosikowski began racing in 1979 and competed in the earliest state and national titles, including the first unofficial national titles – called the Big Plate Series.

Kosikowski pioneered junior female racing and quickly caught the attention of sponsors, riding for SE racing and GT Bicycles.

Although she almost always ran her career number of 84 on the plate – it was no.1’s that she began piling up in the trophy room at home.

Racing in America has always been the dream for many Aussie riders and in 1982 when they began venturing to the USA for race experience, Kosikowski went too… not for experience, but to dominate the locals winning the Murray NBL World Cup and the War of the Stars.

In 1983, she continued her International success when she was amongst the first Australian world champions, winning the 12-13 girl’s IBMXF world plate in Holland.

Back at home, Kosikowski was unbeatable, dominating her home state of QLD and racking up national wins in 1983, 84, and 86 before retiring from the sport at the top of her game.

In 2000, she was honoured with an Australian Sporting Achievement Medal and is also a life member of the Redlands BMX Club, a club with rich history and success, thanks largely to the calibre of riders such as Tracey.

Hall Of Fame Inductee #009 – Tracey Kosikowski

Tracey Kosikowski began racing in 1979 and pioneered junior female racing. She won multiple competitions and was among the first Australian world champions, winning the 12-13 girl’s IBMXF world plate in Holland.

The Redlands Bmx Club rider was unbeatable in her home state and racked up national wins in 1983, 84, and 86 before retiring from the sport at the top of her game.

Congratulations Tracey – 2019 Inductee to the Hall of Fame!

Australian BMX Museum | #BMXAFamily

Posted by BMX Australia on Tuesday, August 13, 2019


Steve Cassap – #010

It was 1978 when Steve Cassap first laid eyes on a BMX bike. As a keen motocross rider, he and his mates soon fell in love with BMX bikes, making jumps in back yards and parking lots and just simply hanging out and having fun.

Cassap took up racing when BMX tracks first appeared in Victoria, but it wasn’t on the track that got him attention – instead, it was what he was doing off the track that did.

Freestyle BMX riding had not officially been invented yet. Originally known as “trick-riding”, Steve had a natural ability to launch his bike and do amazing aerial tricks. These tricks soon caught the eyes of the publications who were looking for anything new they could get their hands on and although Steve didn’t realise it at the time, he was pioneering freestyle riding in Australia.

At the same time as his trick riding career was taking off, Cassap was already quite the entrepreneur.

He studied the American magazines for products and quickly realised that there was a huge market in race plates. At just 17 years of age, and with a small amount of cash, Cassap began producing custom made number plates, all made by hand on his bedroom floor.

He cleverly handed them out to many of the top pro riders who were seen sporting his unique designs, and sales quickly took off.

To assist in promoting his products, Cassap began doing freestyle shows in carparks and shopping centres as well as at major BMX race meetings and scored feature spots on ABC prime time television shows.

He sponsored his own BMX race team and in 1983, he joined Bob Haro as the first internationally sponsored Haro freestyle rider. In 1984, they toured Australia performing shows together and further promoting Cassap and the CASSAP brand.

This brand quickly became an Aussie BMX icon, with CASSAP plates being used by world champions and countless pro riders.

Cassap’s designs were unique and innovative. His fold-over strap design would go on to be copied by some of the largest international brands and was hugely popular throughout the 1980’s.

Cassap was inducted into the Victorian BMX Hall Of Fame in 1993 and it was with great pleasure that the Australian BMX Museum induct their very first freestyle rider and first industry icon into the Australian BMX Hall Of Fame.

Hall Of Fame Inductee #010 – Steve Cassap

It was 1978 when a young Steve Cassap first laid eyes on a BMX bike. A keen motorcross rider, he and his mates soon fell in love with BMX bikes, making jumps in back yards and parking lots, simply hanging out and having fun. Steve took up racing when the first BMX tracks appeared in Victoria, but it wasn’t on the track that got him attention – instead, it was what he was doing off the track that did.

Freestyle BMX riding had not officially been invented yet. Originally known as “trick-riding”, Steve had a natural ability to launch his bike and do amazing aerial tricks. These tricks soon caught the eyes of the publications who were now multiplying and looking for anything new they could get their hands on. Although Steve didn’t realise it at the time – he was pioneering Freestyle riding in Australia.

At the same time as his trick riding career was taking off – Steve was already quite the entrepreneur. He studied the American magazines for products and quickly realised that there was a huge market in number plates. At just 17 years of age, and a small amount of cash, Steve began producing custom made number plates – all made by hand – on his bedroom floor. He cleverly handed them out to many of the top pro riders who were quickly seen sporting his unique designs – and sales quickly took off.

To assist in promoting his products, Steve began doing freestyle shows in carparks and shopping centres, at major BMX race meetings and scored feature spots on ABC prime time television shows. He sponsored his own BMX race team, and In 1983 he joined BOB Haro – as the first internationally sponsored Haro Freestyle rider. In 1984 they would tour Australia performing shows together, further promoting Steve and the CASSAP brand.

This brand quickly became an Aussie BMX icon – with CASSAP plates being used by World Champions and countless Pro riders. Steve’s designs were unique and innovative. His fold-over strap design would go on to be copied by some of the largest international brands and was hugely popular throughout the 1980’s.

Steve was inducted into the Victorian BMX Hall Of Fame in 1993 and it is with great pleasure that we induct our very first Freestyle rider and first Industry icon into the Australian BMX Hall Of Fame.

Ladies and gentleman please welcome – Steve Cassap.

Posted by Australian BMX Hall Of Fame on Wednesday, August 7, 2019


For more information on the Australia BMX Museum’s Hall of Fame – CLICK HERE